Tuesday, June 22
Shadow

One Upstate county had 0 hospital beds available as of Wednesday night – WYFF4 Greenville

One Upstate county had 0 hospital beds available as of Wednesday night

One Upstate county, as of 11:59 p.m. Wednesday, had zero hospital beds available.DHEC data show Cherokee County is at 100% hospital bed occupancy. Spartanburg County has 21 beds available, Union County has five beds available and York County has zero beds available. That is 26 beds available in four-county group. In the entire state, DHEC officials say of the 11,329 inpatient beds currently being used for patient care, 2,427 are occupied by patients who have either tested positive or are under investigation for COVID-19. In addition, of the 1,754 ICU beds currently being used for patient care, 465 are occupied by COVID-19 patients. Meanwhile of the 1,948 available ventilators, 744 are in use and 290 of those are COVID-19 patients. Many hospitals in the state are now canceling elective services to deal with the overwhelming increase in the number of patients, DHEC officials say DHEC reported Thursday that there were 4,809 new confirmed cases and 136 new probable cases of COVID-19, 18 additional confirmed deaths and five new probable deaths. “These increases come as South Carolina faces new records for the highest number of new total cases and highest positivity rate – reaching 5,077 new cases Wednesday, Jan. 6 and a positive rate of 34.2% Tuesday, Jan. 5,” a release said. During the first two weeks of 2021 alone, 45,210 South Carolinians were confirmed to be infected with COVID-19, bringing the total number of confirmed cases in South Carolina to 337,845, probable cases to 33,335, confirmed deaths to 5,420, and 514 probable deaths.“As COVID-19 continues to spread in our communities at staggering rates, we are calling on South Carolinians to take immediate actions to stop the spread of COVID-19 in our communities,” said Dr. Brannon Traxler, Interim Public Health Director for the S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC). “Until the COVID-19 vaccines become more readily available and enough people are vaccinated, we must all act now or continue to face unprecedented numbers of cases that are overwhelming our hospitals and health care systems, as well as taking the lives of those we love. To do that, every one of us must recommit to the fight. We are all on the front-lines. If we don’t act now, we could face many dark months ahead.”

One Upstate county, as of 11:59 p.m. Wednesday, had zero hospital beds available.

DHEC data show Cherokee County is at 100% hospital bed occupancy.

Spartanburg County has 21 beds available, Union County has five beds available and York County has zero beds available. That is 26 beds available in four-county group.

In the entire state, DHEC officials say of the 11,329 inpatient beds currently being used for patient care, 2,427 are occupied by patients who have either tested positive or are under investigation for COVID-19.

In addition, of the 1,754 ICU beds currently being used for patient care, 465 are occupied by COVID-19 patients.

Meanwhile of the 1,948 available ventilators, 744 are in use and 290 of those are COVID-19 patients. Many hospitals in the state are now canceling elective services to deal with the overwhelming increase in the number of patients, DHEC officials say

DHEC reported Thursday that there were 4,809 new confirmed cases and 136 new probable cases of COVID-19, 18 additional confirmed deaths and five new probable deaths.

“These increases come as South Carolina faces new records for the highest number of new total cases and highest positivity rate – reaching 5,077 new cases Wednesday, Jan. 6 and a positive rate of 34.2% Tuesday, Jan. 5,” a release said.

During the first two weeks of 2021 alone, 45,210 South Carolinians were confirmed to be infected with COVID-19, bringing the total number of confirmed cases in South Carolina to 337,845, probable cases to 33,335, confirmed deaths to 5,420, and 514 probable deaths.

“As COVID-19 continues to spread in our communities at staggering rates, we are calling on South Carolinians to take immediate actions to stop the spread of COVID-19 in our communities,” said Dr. Brannon Traxler, Interim Public Health Director for the S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC). “Until the COVID-19 vaccines become more readily available and enough people are vaccinated, we must all act now or continue to face unprecedented numbers of cases that are overwhelming our hospitals and health care systems, as well as taking the lives of those we love. To do that, every one of us must recommit to the fight. We are all on the front-lines. If we don’t act now, we could face many dark months ahead.”

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *