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COVID-19 delta variant identified in Santa Cruz County – KSBW Monterey

The first reported case of the COVID-19 delta variant has been found in Santa Cruz County. According to the Santa Cruz County Public Health Department, the delta variant is on track to become the dominant strain in the U.S. and represents 14.5% of all California cases. The variant is highly transmissible, and more resistant to monoclonal antibody treatment.The person who was carrying the delta variant was in their 50s and experience mild symptoms.The health department noted that complete vaccination is highly effective against the new variant. Officials are asking that people get vaccinated and anyone who missed their second dose of the Pfizer or Moderna vaccine should schedule their second shot as soon as possible. “With the reopening of the economy and slowing vaccination rates, the introduction of a highly transmissible variant creates an especially worrisome situation,” Santa Cruz County Deputy Health Officer Dr. David Ghilarducci said. “For those who are unvaccinated or only partially vaccinated, your risk of serious illness is becoming more likely. The best way to reduce the risk for everyone – including residents not yet eligible to be vaccinated — is to seek a vaccine as soon as possible.”A list of vaccine local COVID-19 vaccine providers is available at:• https://www.santacruzhealth.org/coronavirusvaccine (English)• https://www.santacruzhealth.org/coronavirusvacuna (Spanish)What should you know about the delta variant?It’s a version of the coronavirus that has been found in more than 80 countries since it was first detected in India. It got its name from the World Health Organization, which names notable variants after letters of the Greek alphabet.Viruses constantly mutate and most changes aren’t concerning. But there is a worry that some variants might evolve enough to be more contagious, cause more severe illness or evade the protection that vaccines provide.Experts say the delta variant spreads more easily because of mutations that make it better at latching onto cells in our bodies. In the United Kingdom, the variant is now responsible for 90% of all new infections. In the U.S., it represents 20% of infections, and health officials say it could become the country’s dominant type as well.It’s not clear yet whether the variant makes people sicker since more data needs to be collected, said Dr. Jacob John, who studies viruses at the Christian Medical College at Vellore in southern India.Studies have shown that the available vaccines work against variants, including the delta variant.Researchers in England studied how effective the two-dose AstraZeneca and Pfizer-BioNTech vaccines were against it, compared with the alpha variant that was first detected in the U.K. The vaccines were protective for those who got both doses, but were less so among those who got one dose.It’s why experts say it’s important to be fully vaccinated. And it’s why they say making vaccines accessible globally is so critical.

The first reported case of the COVID-19 delta variant has been found in Santa Cruz County.

According to the Santa Cruz County Public Health Department, the delta variant is on track to become the dominant strain in the U.S. and represents 14.5% of all California cases. The variant is highly transmissible, and more resistant to monoclonal antibody treatment.

The person who was carrying the delta variant was in their 50s and experience mild symptoms.

The health department noted that complete vaccination is highly effective against the new variant. Officials are asking that people get vaccinated and anyone who missed their second dose of the Pfizer or Moderna vaccine should schedule their second shot as soon as possible.

“With the reopening of the economy and slowing vaccination rates, the introduction of a highly transmissible variant creates an especially worrisome situation,” Santa Cruz County Deputy Health Officer Dr. David Ghilarducci said. “For those who are unvaccinated or only partially vaccinated, your risk of serious illness is becoming more likely. The best way to reduce the risk for everyone – including residents not yet eligible to be vaccinated — is to seek a vaccine as soon as possible.”

A list of vaccine local COVID-19 vaccine providers is available at:

https://www.santacruzhealth.org/coronavirusvaccine (English)

https://www.santacruzhealth.org/coronavirusvacuna (Spanish)

It’s a version of the coronavirus that has been found in more than 80 countries since it was first detected in India. It got its name from the World Health Organization, which names notable variants after letters of the Greek alphabet.

Viruses constantly mutate and most changes aren’t concerning. But there is a worry that some variants might evolve enough to be more contagious, cause more severe illness or evade the protection that vaccines provide.

Experts say the delta variant spreads more easily because of mutations that make it better at latching onto cells in our bodies. In the United Kingdom, the variant is now responsible for 90% of all new infections. In the U.S., it represents 20% of infections, and health officials say it could become the country’s dominant type as well.

It’s not clear yet whether the variant makes people sicker since more data needs to be collected, said Dr. Jacob John, who studies viruses at the Christian Medical College at Vellore in southern India.

Studies have shown that the available vaccines work against variants, including the delta variant.

Researchers in England studied how effective the two-dose AstraZeneca and Pfizer-BioNTech vaccines were against it, compared with the alpha variant that was first detected in the U.K.

The vaccines were protective for those who got both doses, but were less so among those who got one dose.

It’s why experts say it’s important to be fully vaccinated. And it’s why they say making vaccines accessible globally is so critical.

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