Tuesday, August 3
Shadow

Delta variant in Ohio: Cases, hospitalizations increasing across state, health officials warn – WLWT Cincinnati

It’s a warning from the highest-ranking public health doctors in Ohio. They’re saying the COVID-19 delta variant is very much here, and it’s only going to get worse — soon to become the dominant strain in the state. Ohio Department of Health Chief Medical Officer Bruce Vanderhoff said after months of dropping virus numbers, the state is suddenly seeing an uptick in cases. The delta variant is largely to blame, Vanderhoff said.The variant, named after the fourth letter of the Greek alphabet, has the attention of the medical community as it continues. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the variant has caused about half of the recent cases in the United States.Research is showing the variant to be more contagious and to make people sicker than the original COVID-19 virus or other variants.According to Vanderfoff, the delta variant is 50% more contagious than the U.K. variant, which itself was 50% more contagious than the variant the caused Ohio’s winter surge.The highly contagious delta variant accounted for 15% of samples in June 6-19 sequencing, Vanderhoff said, and the early date for June 20-July 3 shows this percentage has more than doubled. “Based on the trends it’s clear the delta variant is on the rise in Ohio,” Vanderhoff said.As a result, cases and hospitalizations are again on the rise in Ohio. But there is hope: vaccination. Doctors emphasized if you’re vaccinated with Pfizer or Moderna, you are pretty well protected from delta and that two doses are better than one. They said Johnson & Johnson, also known as the Janssen vaccine, offered some effectiveness, but not as much as the other two.“The good news is if you are vaccinated, you are protected – at least against being hospitalized or becoming seriously ill,” Vanderhoff said. “We have two Ohios: One vaccinated and the other unvaccinated and vulnerable to delta.”Still, a troubling trend continues. Medical officials said even in areas where the delta variant is known to dominate, more than 97% of those hospitalized have not been vaccinated. “It takes five to six weeks to be fully protected after you’re vaccinated. With the fall and winter months coming, we need to prepare ourselves now — no need to wait. If you can’t get vaccinated please wear a mask and practice social distancing,” Vanderhoff said.

It’s a warning from the highest-ranking public health doctors in Ohio.

They’re saying the COVID-19 delta variant is very much here, and it’s only going to get worse — soon to become the dominant strain in the state.

Ohio Department of Health Chief Medical Officer Bruce Vanderhoff said after months of dropping virus numbers, the state is suddenly seeing an uptick in cases.

The delta variant is largely to blame, Vanderhoff said.

The variant, named after the fourth letter of the Greek alphabet, has the attention of the medical community as it continues. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the variant has caused about half of the recent cases in the United States.

Research is showing the variant to be more contagious and to make people sicker than the original COVID-19 virus or other variants.

According to Vanderfoff, the delta variant is 50% more contagious than the U.K. variant, which itself was 50% more contagious than the variant the caused Ohio’s winter surge.

The highly contagious delta variant accounted for 15% of samples in June 6-19 sequencing, Vanderhoff said, and the early date for June 20-July 3 shows this percentage has more than doubled.

“Based on the trends it’s clear the delta variant is on the rise in Ohio,” Vanderhoff said.

As a result, cases and hospitalizations are again on the rise in Ohio. But there is hope: vaccination. Doctors emphasized if you’re vaccinated with Pfizer or Moderna, you are pretty well protected from delta and that two doses are better than one. They said Johnson & Johnson, also known as the Janssen vaccine, offered some effectiveness, but not as much as the other two.

“The good news is if you are vaccinated, you are protected – at least against being hospitalized or becoming seriously ill,” Vanderhoff said. “We have two Ohios: One vaccinated and the other unvaccinated and vulnerable to delta.”

Still, a troubling trend continues. Medical officials said even in areas where the delta variant is known to dominate, more than 97% of those hospitalized have not been vaccinated.

“It takes five to six weeks to be fully protected after you’re vaccinated. With the fall and winter months coming, we need to prepare ourselves now — no need to wait. If you can’t get vaccinated please wear a mask and practice social distancing,” Vanderhoff said.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *