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More California counties recommend wearing masks inside amid delta variant concerns – KCRA Sacramento

More California counties are recommending that residents wear masks indoors, even if they’re fully vaccinated against COVID-19. The recommendations come as the delta variant has become California’s predominant strain and counties are seeing an uptick in cases. Those who are unvaccinated are still supposed to wear masks in indoor public spaces.Mask recommendations in Northern CaliforniaIn the Sacramento region, both Sacramento and Yolo counties this week said masks are strongly recommended inside where vaccination verification is not required and the vaccination status of others is not known. Several Bay Area counties on Friday jointly recommended that vaccinated people mask up indoors again at public buildings, offices or businesses to help limit the spread of the highly infectious delta variant. The seven counties include Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara and Sonoma, according to the San Francisco Chronicle. Mask recommendations in Southern CaliforniaWhile several counties are strongly recommending masking indoors, Los Angles County on Thursday said it was restoring its indoor mask mandate for all. One of California’s most populous counties, San Diego County, is so far not changing its mask guidance.California stopped requiring those who have been vaccinated to wear a mask indoors in many cases on June 15 when the state fully reopened its economy. In doing so, it did away with physical distancing and capacity limits for indoor businesses and restaurants. However, there has been a recent spike in COVID-19 cases, most of them the highly transmissible delta variant. The vast majority of new cases are among unvaccinated people.Health officials have called for more people to get vaccinated to protect themselves and others. Vaccines decrease the severity of COVID-19, reduce hospitalizations and decrease the risk of death.Dr. Vanessa Walker, a pulmonary and critical care physician who treats COVID-19 patients at Sutter Roseville Medical Center, said that the more people who get COVID-19, the greater chance of new, more dangerous variants, including one that could be less effective against current vaccines.— The Associated Press contributed to reporting.

More California counties are recommending that residents wear masks indoors, even if they’re fully vaccinated against COVID-19.

The recommendations come as the delta variant has become California’s predominant strain and counties are seeing an uptick in cases. Those who are unvaccinated are still supposed to wear masks in indoor public spaces.

Mask recommendations in Northern California

In the Sacramento region, both Sacramento and Yolo counties this week said masks are strongly recommended inside where vaccination verification is not required and the vaccination status of others is not known.

Several Bay Area counties on Friday jointly recommended that vaccinated people mask up indoors again at public buildings, offices or businesses to help limit the spread of the highly infectious delta variant. The seven counties include Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara and Sonoma, according to the San Francisco Chronicle.

Mask recommendations in Southern California

While several counties are strongly recommending masking indoors, Los Angles County on Thursday said it was restoring its indoor mask mandate for all.

One of California’s most populous counties, San Diego County, is so far not changing its mask guidance.

California stopped requiring those who have been vaccinated to wear a mask indoors in many cases on June 15 when the state fully reopened its economy. In doing so, it did away with physical distancing and capacity limits for indoor businesses and restaurants.

However, there has been a recent spike in COVID-19 cases, most of them the highly transmissible delta variant. The vast majority of new cases are among unvaccinated people.

Health officials have called for more people to get vaccinated to protect themselves and others. Vaccines decrease the severity of COVID-19, reduce hospitalizations and decrease the risk of death.

Dr. Vanessa Walker, a pulmonary and critical care physician who treats COVID-19 patients at Sutter Roseville Medical Center, said that the more people who get COVID-19, the greater chance of new, more dangerous variants, including one that could be less effective against current vaccines.

— The Associated Press contributed to reporting.

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