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Hospitals nationwide face shortage of medical staff amid spike in COVID-19 cases – ABC News

Hospitals nationwide face shortage of medical staff amid spike in COVID-19 cases – ABC News

Goshen Health Hospital in Indiana has had to issue a public call for help from people with medical experience. In a Facebook post, the CEO wrote, “We invite you to consider if you are someone who could make a difference.” The Mayo Clinic in Minnesota is bringing back retirees, redeploying employees from other parts of the country, and reassigning researchers to patient care after 905 employees contracted COVID-19 in the last two weeks. And in North Dakota, the governor announced last week that to avoid a shortage of staff the state would implement “crisis” guidelines that allow nurses who test positive for COVID-19 to continue to work, as reported by the Grand Forks Herald. Hospitals across the country are facing an influx of COVID-19 patients, the most Americans hospitalized for the di...
Were celebrating Thanksgiving amid a pandemic. Heres how we did it in 1918 — and what happened next – USA TODAY

Were celebrating Thanksgiving amid a pandemic. Heres how we did it in 1918 — and what happened next – USA TODAY

More than 200,000 dead since March. Cities in lockdown. Vaccine trials underway. And a holiday message, of sorts: "See that Thanksgiving celebrations are restricted as much as possible so as to prevent another flare-up." But it isn't the message of Thanksgiving 2020. It's the Thanksgiving Day notice that ran in the Omaha World Herald on Nov. 28, 1918, when Americans found themselves in a similar predicament to the millions now grappling with how to celebrate the holiday season amid the coronavirus pandemic. "Every time I hear someone say these are unprecedented times, I say no, no they're not," said Brittany Hutchinson, assistant curator at the Chicago History Museum. "They did this in 1918." On Thanksgiving more than a century ago, many Americans, like today, were living under various ph...
Not all businesses on board with Gov. Stitt’s new restaurant and bar rules – KFOR Oklahoma City

Not all businesses on board with Gov. Stitt’s new restaurant and bar rules – KFOR Oklahoma City

OKLAHOMA CITY (KFOR) – Some business are fighting back against Gov. Kevin Stitt’s new 11 p.m. bar and restaurant curfew while others are doing everything they can to adhere to the rules. “We have a concert tonight and we’re gonna go forward with the concert,” said Steve Brack, owner of Western Nights. Brack’s Northwest Oklahoma City business is taking a risk this weekend. “It’s time to get real,” says OKC Mayor, but Gov. Stitt says, “I feel good with the decisions at this point,” as holidays approach with COVID-19 on the rise They’re staying open late, despite Stitt’s new rules. “We’re open six hours a night, two nights a week. That’s 12 hours a week we have to do our business,” Brack said. Earlier this week, Stitt handed down restrictions on b...
Springfield Hospitals: Were Full, And Its Starting To Impact Non-COVID Patients, Too – KSMU Radio

Springfield Hospitals: Were Full, And Its Starting To Impact Non-COVID Patients, Too – KSMU Radio

On Friday, Springfield’s two main hospital systems, Mercy and CoxHealth, issued a stark warning to the public:  they’re full, due to a wave of COVID-19 patients, and that’s starting to impact non-COVID patients, too. At a press conference Friday, health officials said hospitalizations have skyrocketed this week. Hospitals have begun to shuffle dates of elective surgeries to maximze staffing, but the lack of beds and staffing are affecting emergency and acute care, too. Leaders from both hospitals, as well as from Greene County and the City of Springfield, once again asked Missouri Governor Mike Parson to issue a statewide mask mandate to help control the spread of the coronavirus, saying the spiraling numbers are leading to pote...
Wayne County urges schools to switch to remote learning – Detroit Free Press

Wayne County urges schools to switch to remote learning – Detroit Free Press

Wayne County officials are urging all schools in the county to switch to remote learning through Jan. 15 as COVID-19 cases continue to rise. "At the present time, COVID-19 case rates have increased resulting in a second wave that is at a level higher than the first peak in April 2020," Health Division Director Carol Austerberry said in the advisory. The recommendation is an about face from earlier in the week when the county said that in-person learning was OK for Pre-K through 8th-grade. More:Detroit schools halt face-to-face learning because of COVID-19 More:Detroit schools to offer learning hubs during shutdown "The Public Health Division now is revising that earlier advisory and recommending all schools adopt a temporary remote learning model," she said. Austerberry said the rising ca...
She just celebrated her 90th birthday: 6 COVID deaths in 2 days at Vance County nursing home – WRAL.com

She just celebrated her 90th birthday: 6 COVID deaths in 2 days at Vance County nursing home – WRAL.com

Henderson, N.C. — Six residents of a Vance County nursing home died of COVID-19 over the course of 48 hours earlier this week. According to a Granville-Vance public health update issued Thursday, Senior Citizens Home Inc. in Henderson has seen eight total deaths, with six of those coming on Tuesday and Wednesday. "It is difficult to see the latest data associated with Senior Citizens Nursing Home which includes 47 residents and 24 staff members positive for COVID-19 as of 5 p.m.," Lisa Macon Harrison, Granville-Vance County health director, said on Friday. A woman who lost her grandmother said even the slightest connection was stolen from her because she didn’t know her grandmother had the virus until it was too late. ...
Study: Frequent, mass rapid testing could make dent in COVID-19 in 6 weeks – Business Insider – Business Insider

Study: Frequent, mass rapid testing could make dent in COVID-19 in 6 weeks – Business Insider – Business Insider

Mass and frequent rapid testing for COVID-19 could make a large dent in the pandemic within six weeks, a new study claims. "Our big picture finding is that, when it comes to public health, it's better to have a less sensitive test with results today than a more sensitive test with results tomorrow," said Daniel Larremore, a computer science professor at Colorado University Boulder and lead author of the study. Testing 75% of a city's population every three days would reduce infections by 88%, "sufficient to drive the epidemic toward extinction within six weeks." Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Mass rapid-testing for COVID-19 — especially of those people showing no signs of infection — could bring an end to the pandemic within six weeks, clai...